Beaded Chandelier

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When we moved into our current house, there were a few projects we knew we’d get around to, but weren’t exactly first on the list. Our house, having been built in 1985, still has a few left over dated 80s fixtures, one being a hideous chandelier that used to hang in our stairwell (see before picture). We lived with that thing for three years wondering what we could do with it (without having to go and buy a brand new, expensive fixture).

One day Dan got sick of the ugly thing and stripped it of its cheap, plastic planks–at that point I knew I had to get off my lazy butt and do something creative with it. In it’s bare state it looked like an alien with a thousand prongs sticking out all over. After leaving it bare for probably a month, I decided I couldn’t stand that thing staring at me anymore, so I finally got to work. I went to my jewelry kit and found a bunch of larger beads left over from some other projects, and then supplemented what I didn’t have with new colored glass beads from the craft store. I created about six to eight basic strands of different lengths and then left a loop on the tops so I could hang them on the prongs. I tried my best to use big enough beads to cover the left-over light sockets on the inside of the fixture (you can still see them, but it’s not that bad). Then I finished off the bottoms with some oblong, retro pearls that my mom gave me.

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Before

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After

I’m pretty happy with how it turned out. Mostly I like how it casts some really cool shadows on the walls and ceiling. Now I have to think of what to do with our other dated 80s chandelier that hangs over the dining room table.

Java Sleeve

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Just a short post about a coffee sleeve I made. Not much to say really, just that I had lots of leftover felt from my wreath, so I decided to make this coffee snuggie. I used a paper sleeve that I got from a coffee shop, unraveled it, and used it for my template. I hot glued a strip of felt to the inside to cover my stitching. I might make different ones for the seasons and make some for gifts.

Office Wall Art

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If you’re like me and you’re married to a musician, or you’ve just randomly let one take up residence in your house, AND you’re a graphic designer, AND you share an office with your musician, you are probably racking your brain to come up with an artistic solution to melding “music” and “design” into an interesting look for your office. Since we joined office-forces we’ve been working on creating a space that works for both of us. More on this later, because to be honest, we moved into the office six months ago, but we’re still not even close to being done with it yet.

In the meantime, my musician had to put some foam installments on the office walls, so when he records he can cut down on the, um, (crap, I’m not a musician! -Oh!) “ricocheting” of sounds. I’ve covered these pieces of foam with plain fabric, but they still need something artistic so they’re not just eight plain blocks on the walls. I have some plans to do some painting on some of them, but on the ones that are closest to the “design area” of our room, I wanted to do something designy/graphic/typeface-centered, but I honestly didn’t want to take a ton of time on the project. So I got this idea after I had done something similar on my office walls at work.

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I cut some pages out of one of my Font source books (Font Bureau, if you’re curious and want to go check out their fonts). I cut them as squarely as I could and pinned them onto the foam squares. Really easy and they actually look quite nice.

Here are some close up shots of it:

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**UPDATE** It took me some time to think about what to do with the other foam squares in the room. They’re smaller than the above ones, about 1.5 feet square. I had just been drying some really cool looking flowers and I got the inspiration to tack them onto the leftover squares. Seriously simple. Here are some pictures.